That’s $58.3 Billion dollars. That’s roughly how much money we wasted in 2010 in the US according to the Department of Energy because of air leaking out of our building envelopes. If your building leaks energy, you’re paying more for energy than you need to. Clearly you’re not alone. If you’re ready to claim your share of the savings, it’s quicker and easier than you think.
Q. "I talked to a building product supplier for WALLTITE spray foam, he is suggesting to use 2" or 3" of closed cell-spray foam in the joists areas instead of the batts insulation. He says it will work with outboard rigid insulation. There is a location of a cantilevered floor area with steel beam so I may need to use spray foam to protect the steel beam. It would then be convenient continue to spray in the floor joist cavities and then apply 5" of polyiso outboard of the bottom cantilever floor sheathing."

Carefully examine the roof membrane (surface material) for cracks, tears, blisters, evidence of ponding, exposed foam, and open seams. If already coated, evaluate the condition of the coating. Pay particular attention to areas around roof penetrations (vents, skylights, pipes, etc), ponding areas, cracks in parapet walls, and the attachment of roof membranes to parapet walls. Roofs should be in good condition to warrant coating.

How Much Is A Board Foot Of Spray Foam


Carefully examine the roof membrane (surface material) for cracks, tears, blisters, evidence of ponding, exposed foam, and open seams. If already coated, evaluate the condition of the coating. Pay particular attention to areas around roof penetrations (vents, skylights, pipes, etc), ponding areas, cracks in parapet walls, and the attachment of roof membranes to parapet walls. Roofs should be in good condition to warrant coating.
This is more common with closed cell foam, but it happens with open cell foam, too. Since closed cell foam has a higher R-value per inch, installers generally spray 2" in walls and 3" in rooflines to meet the energy code requirements of R-13 and R-19, respectively. (I'm not going to dive into the energy code here, but these numbers apply to many climate zones, the latter being allowed under the UA tradeoffs rule. See the Energy Nerd's blog on this topic if you want to argue.)

SPF application is fast and effective. Unlike traditional insulation types like fiberglass, which require a separate air-sealing step, spray foam can air seal and insulate a structure in one step, thus keeping the project moving forward. Combining these steps coupled with a spray-on application decreases installation time and delivers the ability to fit into hard-to-reach places, like eaves, odd-sized cavities, and rims. In addition to installation efficiencies, spray foam can provide excellent thermal, acoustical and indoor air quality performance in any climate. 


OK, Peter, I finally went back and read Alex Wilson's article on what he perceives as a serious problem. I haven't seen the full report, but based on the summary he wrote on the Green Building Advisor website, I question the science. It seems to me that he's chosen the wrong metric and he's basing his conclusion on too many assumptions because he doesn't have enough data. You can see my comments at the end of his article. http://www.youtube.com/v/ggLAUsiuI_o&feature=share
Clean and free the roof surface of any debris and then dry the surface using a cloth. If you happen to have a current coating on the surface, check for adhesion. Consider removing loose coating, repairing, cleaning and then checking the area. Remember to use Energy Guard without thinning it because it is sold ready for use. Containers should not be left open except for a short period of time. You must also ensure that you check for any existing coating adhesion before opening Energy Guard. For application, you will require a brush preferably a bristle brush (synthetic) or a short nap roller. You can also use a good airless sprayer with a 0.031 or 0.027 tip to apply the coatings at (3000 psi/1gpm). You will also need water for cleaning up when you are done.

Current guidelines recommend up to 10 inches of insulation in your attic . This is usually added to the ground, rather than the roof line, which results in the loss of your storage area, due to not being able to refit floor boards after installation. By implementing spray foam insulation to the roof line, you regain the lost 10 inches, thus increasing storage, height and practicality.


We had issues with getting this foam to turn green in summertime in the South. We needed up spending an additional $300 on being able to spray this foam: 110 window a/c for shop & a $60 tarp to drape over the top, to keep the temps down. The areas where we had trouble-shooted were sticky & even after we wiped it down, the new green foam wouldn't stick. My husband had to apply Liquid Nails to it. For over $800, I expected alot more, plus the sellers customer service skills were in need of improvement.

Where To Use Spray Foam


The insulation at eaves level will leave your loft area comfortable for use and free from condensation. By installing the insulation at rafter level, it keeps the loft void warmer and prevents condensation build-up, which can otherwise occur when increasing insulation at ceiling level. The warmer, drier, cleaner roof space eliminates the risk of pipes and tanks freezing.

If you cut the nails holding one of the corner studs to the bottom plate and the top plate with a Sawzall, you can use a flat bar (or a flat bar plus a wrecking bar) to pull the stud off the sheathing nails. Either re-use the stud, or buy a new stud, and install the stud with toenails as shown in the link I provided in Comment #51 (this link: Outside corner detail). http://kvsprayfoam.com/images/roofing-foam-silicone.jpg
We have a 1950's ranch in Atlanta and are interviewing foam contractors to spray open cell under the roof, with an "ankle wall" out towards the eaves to seal the attic. My wife and daughters are chemically sensitive, so I'm trying to figure out how to minimize the fumes coming into the house. Additionally, at least one contractor has offered (for > $900) to remove our existing rock wool & R-13 fibreglass from the attic floor to "increase cross-ventilation into the attic". Seems to me I can't both minimize fumes AND increase cross-ventilation. They also offered to spray a fire-retardant on for >$600. Would ventilation during installation help any or woud the retardant seal off the foam and help that way? Thanks... 

Where Can I Purchase Spray Foam Insulation

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