The problem was that the installer was doing his first spray foam job ever, and the thickness of the insulation varied from zero (visible roof deck) to about 9". Unfortunately, good average thickness doesn't cut it. The coverage needs to be uniform because a lot of heat will go through the under-insulated areas. (See my article on flat or lumpy insulation performance.)
If you're chemically sensitive, it's probably not a good idea to get it installed, but it's also not a good idea to breathe musty air from the crawl space either. In addition, your house and its contents are made of lots of materials that affect your indoor air quality. If you're really concerned about this, hire a company to test your air and tell you what you can do about it. https://www.youtube.com/v/ggLAUsiuI_o?version=3
Spray foam can be used for a variety of applications, including attics, crawl spaces, walls, and more. At Dr. Energy Saver, we specialize in spray foam installation that makes your home more efficient and comfortable. If you're interested in learning more about how spray foam can help your home, call Dr. Energy Saver for a consultation and estimate.
The process by which heat energy in the form of light (usually IR unless the substrate is hot enough to glow in the visible range) is emitted more strongly by warm surfaces and absorbed by other materials especially those of low IR reflectivity (think matte black finish). Radiant heat transfer does not require a medium. Foam insulation materials, such as spray foam insulation, are opaque to thermal radiation, like most solid materials.
Spray foam insulation systems effectively seal walls, roofs, corners and other surfaces, creating a more comfortable household because it provides a barrier against drafts and associated pollen and dust. Long-term, properly installed spray foam won’t change its form or shape, meaning it will deliver the same benefits that it did years—or even decades—after being installed, while other insulation materials may settle and create future gaps in the insulation.  

I employed a company to insulate my three story house in 2011. They started Insulating it in August of 2011...They said it would be a 3-4 day job. They installed it in 0.5"-8" lifts all in the same cavity, this left burned insulation and voids. They removed what they told me was the bad insulation and in the process cut many electrical wires. They fixed this. They then reinstalled too thick again in some spots and removed again. They then installed it for a 3rd time. The areas that I thought were good are now separating from the structural members leaving voids. As of October 2012, 1 year and 2 months of dealing with the contractor I told them I want proof that what has been installed carries a warranty or I want my money back and I will fix the problems myself. They have yet to provide me with this warranty. I have spent many hours in the house looking at what is bad and they need to fix. I am frustrated, 14 months of additional rent due to their negligence. I would like to know how I can get proof that the product carries the manufacturers lifetime warranty, or has it been installed improperly throughout the entire house. Desperately awaiting your response.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ggLAUsiuI_o&app=desktop
SPF, a spray-applied cellular plastic, is made by mixing chemicals to create foam. Those chemicals react very quickly, expanding on contact to create foam that insulates, air seals and provides a moisture barrier. When properly installed, SPF forms a continuous barrier on walls, around corners and on contoured surfaces. It resists heat transfer very well and is an effective solution for reducing unwanted air infiltration through cracks, seams, and joints.
I used this product to seal and insulate my rim joists as I am finishing the basement. The builder used R13 batt insulation when we built the house 3 years ago. I use a dehumidifier to control moisture in the basement which is below grade. The setting I use is 55%. The dehumidifier kicks on periodically and requires emptying every few days. Since using the foam all around the house on the rim joists and sill plate, the dehumidifier has stayed at 50% for over two weeks since spraying and rarely turns on anymore. I also put the original R13 batt insulation back up after the foam cured.
Open-cell is also known as half-pound foam. It has an R-Value of 3.5-3.6 per inch, and its density is bout 0.5 pounds per cubic food. Low-density foams like these are made partially from raw biological materials Carbon dioxide or water is also used in the makeup. Open-cell uses far less material than closed-cell, but its R-Value is lower. Also, open cell requires a vapor retarder (like gypsum wallboard) and is riskier when used for roof sheathing. It's not highly recommended that you use open-cell insulation if you live in a cold climate unless you have that extra barrier. You should also compare how much money you spend versus how effective the open-cell insulation is wherever it's installed.
Spray polyurethane foam, or SPF, is the main type of 2-part, closed-cell spray foam used by insulation contractors. Large-scale insulation jobs require special equipment as well as safety gear to protect the installer from chemical fumes during installation. When the foam cures and hardens just several minutes after application, it's completely safe for as long as it stays in place.

How Much Better Is Spray Foam Insulation


Polyurethane is a closed-cell foam insulation material that initially contains a low-conductivity gas in its cells.[5] As a result of the high thermal resistance of the gas, spray polyurethane insulation typically has an initial R-value around R-3.4 to R-6.7 per inch.[5] In comparison, blown fiberglass typically has an R-Value of only R-3 to R-4 per inch.[6]

Spray Foam Cost


We had issues with getting this foam to turn green in summertime in the South. We needed up spending an additional $300 on being able to spray this foam: 110 window a/c for shop & a $60 tarp to drape over the top, to keep the temps down. The areas where we had trouble-shooted were sticky & even after we wiped it down, the new green foam wouldn't stick. My husband had to apply Liquid Nails to it. For over $800, I expected alot more, plus the sellers customer service skills were in need of improvement.

Where To Use Spray Foam


Spray foam can be used for a variety of applications, including attics, crawl spaces, walls, and more. At Dr. Energy Saver, we specialize in spray foam installation that makes your home more efficient and comfortable. If you're interested in learning more about how spray foam can help your home, call Dr. Energy Saver for a consultation and estimate. https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=ggLAUsiuI_o
I have never used foam insulation before and this was easy for me to use right out of the box. I had a 4'x8"x8" cavity in my basement that houses a waterline. When the previous homeowner installed this they put no insulation in at all and being that it's an exterior wall in the basement and I live in the Midwest that thing was pushing so much cold air in it was incredibly uncomfortable. Out of the box and job completed in about 5 minutes. Stopped all drafts and created a nice 2" barrier on the wall in which I will install some extra bat insulation over it. 4 stars because the spray isn't very good passed 6-8" from the surface. Make sure you can reach the surface you want to coat. Great for small jobs!
A. You can use closed-cell spray foam that way if you want, although you should realize that the spray foam will prevent the roof sheathing from drying inward. This approach should only be used if the roof sheathing is bone dry, because it will never dry when sandwiched in this manner. Most building scientists would prefer to see fiberglass rather than closed-cell spray foam under the roof sheathing in this type of assembly.

How Much To Spray Foam Basement


If you don't have the patience to slowly fill the void with spray foam through holes drilled in one of the studs, you could (if you were an experienced carpenter) use a Sawzall to remove one of the studs and re-frame the corner as a two-stud corner. Then you could either insulate the void with a fiberglass batt or simply present the two-stud corner to the spray-foam contractor as an accessible corner. http://youtube.com/watch?v=ggLAUsiuI_o&app=desktop
Good article, but it seems like you can chalk up almost all of those problems to the experience level of whomever is spraying the foam. Spray foam isn't an inherently bad product, but it's pretty easy to botch if the hired company is inexperienced. Fiberglass may be foolproof to install, but then again it has a terrible R-Value compared to a good spray foam. People just need to get referrals and do their homework whenever they research a spray foam contractor.

Water-based acrylic coatings have more than 30 years of proven performance over a wide range of substrates. It is the coating of choice for metal roofs since it is highly reflective, can be easily tinted and is not extremely slippery when damp. When used with our rust primer, even rusted roofs can be saved. TIP: If you have a metal roof or a low slope roof that doesn't pond water, consider acrylic coatings.

I am on my third project with foam it green. I like the simplicity of it, the color blending to make it green, it alerts you quickly if something is wrong with the blending so you don't waste alot of valuable material. Follow the instructions closely, put in the prep time and you will have no issues. It seems most people's negative comments have to do with not following instructions or guidelines. It is about as close to point and shoot as you can get but there are still some essential details that need attention. The only complaint I have is the fragility of the gun, last project I cracked one on accident but luckily needed two kits to finish the project so I had a back up, but I was more careful to gently lay the gun down between applications. http://m.youtube.com/e/ggLAUsiuI_o
As mentioned above, These coatings can work with almost any roof type. Another advantage is they are long-lasting. The coatings are resistant to fungi and mildew among other common materials that damage roofs with time. Another advantage of the coatings is that they are seamless, providing a neat uniform coating. Elastomeric coatings offer individual benefits to certain roof types. For instance, polyurethane foam roofing benefits greatly from the coatings by getting great ozone and UV light protection. The heat reflexive properties also offer great benefits such as lowering cooling costs. This advantage is enjoyed regardless of the rooftype. The heat reflexive properties also offer anti-aging properties when coatings reflect harsh sun rays which age roofs with time. Elastomeric roof coatings are also simple to use, VOC compliant and nontoxic.

Spray Foam Garage


To avoid the expense re-roofing a house that is simply suffering from nail fatigue, and to obtain optimum insulation, an 85mm layer of polyurethane foam can be sprayed onto the underside of the slates or tiles of a pitched roof. This stabilises and weatherproofs the roof by fixing the nails, battens and roofing felt. As the foam is a superior insulant, coupled with just 100mm of insulation at joist level, your roof will also meet the stringent thermal performance standards required for a new home. A typical roof can be insulated using the polyurethane treatment for around half the cost of re-roofing.
Most samples of closed cell spray foam insulation have an R-value of 7 or greater. Open cell spray foam, which is acknowledged to have a lower density, has an R-value of 4 which still rates higher than other kinds of insulation. Spray foam can be evenly employed on a surface and even be inserted into hard-to-reach places to produce a tight seal over the area.
Allison--would be very interested in your take on the GHG issues of foams, which have received lots of smart commentary recently. To highlight a few: architect Jesse Thompson's comments on Tom's Good vs Bad post on Energy Circle, the very thorough piece by Alex Wilson on Green Building Advisor and Michael Anschel's cautionary diatribe on Remodeling. 

Where Can You Buy Foam Spray

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